Rose Gold Wedding Bands

Your fiancé has a beautiful rose gold wedding band and you'd love to have one to match it. Man are the pictures going to be nice and what's even nicer, is knowing that your rings go together as well as you two do. The combination of gold and copper is what creates the regal look of rose gold and there is something to be said about starting things off as royalty. Who said you'd never be royals? Rose gold wedding rings are the surefire way to let everyone know just how stylish you are - and you are.

A Brief History of Rose Gold Wedding Rings

"Rose gold." At first listen, the term may not sound very manly, what with the flowers and the glitzy gold and the... Is that... Is that metal PINK?

But there is a lot more to rose gold, and rose gold rings, than meets the eye, young bro-ling. That's why Manly Bands is back for another lesson in ring metals and styles. 

Rose gold (also known as pink or red gold) started it's rise to fame and popularity back in the early 18th century in Russia. Some experts have theorized this as being a factor in why the metal was once known as "Russian gold," although this writer has doubts... What? I thought it was funny!

Anyways, one possible explanation for rose gold's existence stems from basic metallurgy: Impurities in the smelting process can turn the color of standard gold to a variety of different hues and shades. Rose gold is created by copper being introduced into the mix, with occasional traces of silver. This could also explain white gold, which is a mix containing gold, nickel, silver and palladium, a common, but flashier variant of gold that is nearly identical to platinum.

Whether the first samples of rose gold were an accident or a planned experiment, it quickly became a popular material due to it's warm and regal coloring. Marry that with the fact that the added copper makes the gold stronger than it would be in it's pure form, and now we really have something special.

The Materials Used

Typical rose gold consists of a mix resembling 75 percent gold and 22-25 percent copper, with up to around 3 percent silver added in certain forms. It has a similar metallic shine to standard yellow gold, but with a pink/reddish hue. Some have described the feeling you get seeing rose gold as "warming, comforting, but also luxurious." It's something different, in a deliberate way. It isn't just normal gold; it was changed into something more.

That is probably exactly what Apple was thinking when they brought rose gold back into the spotlight, introducing it as a new color option for the iPhone 6s. It was the start of the most recent uptick in rose gold popularity, even though jewelers have never let the metal slip too far into obscurity.

Rose gold, in contrast to it's unaltered cousin, tends to match well with any skin tone. It works well as a band, while pairing just as nicely with a wide array of stones and settings. It is a versatile metal, with an alluring appearance and style.

Our Range of Rose Gold Wedding Bands

You may not be convinced yet that rose gold is for you, and that's OK. You haven't heard some of the best parts yet!

You know how we told you that rose gold contains a portion of copper in the mix? Guess what that does? Did you guess, "It makes the overall product less costly"? You did? You sir, you get a cookie for your obvious intelligence. Because yes, adding copper does bring the cost of the metal as a whole down a notch, making it even more affordable than plain ol' yellow gold. And, as was mentioned earlier, copper also makes the metal a bit stronger, which means more durability. THAT is something a manly ring-buyer always looks for.

A ring like the MVP takes the savings even further, opting instead to go with a simple rose gold plating rather than a solid metal ring. It's stylish and sophisticated, without being too brash and flashy. Comforting elegance, if you will. It says, "I am a man of simple but refined tastes." It stands out, but not in a gaudy "look at me, look at me" way.

Or maybe you like the look of the Gentleman, with it's matching rose gold-plated edges. It shares many features with a traditional yellow gold band, but with it's own unique and engaging style. That is one of the greatest strengths of rose gold: It does what it's more popular cousin can do, but it does it in it's own way. Not too flashy, not too mundane. An awesome balance you just won't find with most other metals.

The point is this: If you are looking to go with a more traditional wedding band (or band for any other occasion for that matter), rose gold is very much a viable option. It has strength and versatility. It's fancy, but not overly so. It has it's roots in the past, but no so far back as to lose that special newness of the modern age. It's something unique, but popular enough to be recognized. It's elegance that won't break your wallet, but can boost your ego.

One last bonus of rose gold: It offers you one of your best chances to sport a manly ring of your own and still have a ring that pairs with your spouse. A black tungsten carbide ring won't pair so well with a yellow gold ring with diamonds. But if your "Boo-Thang" loves rose gold, and you need your manly fix, check out the Instigator. Inner rose gold flair that is gorgeous in photos, but more subdued on your hand... Say, paired with the Poet... That is an elegant match indeed.

How to Care for Your Rose Gold Wedding Ring

Soap and water my friend. Be gentle as these rings are plated rose gold, so if you rub too hard or use a scratchy cleaning partner (leave the steel wool out of this), you may be super disappointed.

Don't forget to stop by our ring size guide and get your  Manly Ring Sizer to make sure you know your size first. It'll save a lot of headaches and pre-wedding fights. Trust us...

So there you have it. Give rose gold a look, and see if it's the metal that fits your manly ring needs.